Leading Causes of Death for 63-Year-Olds

As you approach your 60s, it’s natural to start thinking about your health and what you can do to protect it. While you can’t control everything that affects your well-being, knowledge is power. That’s why we’ve compiled a list of the leading causes of death for 63-year-olds. Understanding these risks can help you make informed choices about your lifestyle and healthcare, so you can stay healthy and happy for as long as possible. From heart disease to cancer, we’ll explore the factors that can increase your risk and provide tips for prevention. (Note: See here for 62-year-old causes of death or here for the most common causes of death for 64-year-olds.)

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Leading Causes of Death for 63-Year-Olds (2021 CDC Data)

Cause of DeathTotal Deaths
Heart Disease14,375
Cancer14,248
COVID-199,038
Accidents (Incl. Overdoses)3,038
Chronic Lower Respiratory Disease2,611
Diabetes2,253
Liver Disease (incl. Cirrhosis)1,853
Kidney Disease825
Septicemia812
Suicide649
Flu (Non-COVID)621
Pneumonitis Due To Solids & Liquids261
Alzheimer’s Disease242
Viral Hepatitis155
Homicide144
Parkinson’s Disease144
HIV140
Congenital Malformations139
Nutritional Deficiency109
Peptic Ulcer86
Anemias81
Enterocolitis58
Gallbladder Disorder33

According to recent data from the CDC, the two leading causes of death for 63-year-olds are heart disease and cancer, with 14,375 and 14,248 reported deaths, respectively. COVID-19 comes in as the third leading cause of death with 9,038 reported deaths.

Accidents, including overdoses, were responsible for 3,038 deaths among 63-year-olds in 2021. Chronic lower respiratory disease and diabetes are also significant causes of mortality in this age group, with 2,611 and 2,253 reported deaths, respectively.

Liver disease, including cirrhosis, was the cause of death in 1,853 individuals while kidney disease and septicemia resulted in 825 and 812 deaths respectively. Suicide is the cause of death in 649 individuals and non-COVID flu in 621.

Other notable causes of mortality among 63-year-olds include pneumonia due to solids and liquids, Alzheimer’s disease, viral hepatitis, and homicide. Parkinson’s disease and HIV were also reported as causes of death among many individuals in this age group.

The data indicates that chronic and non-communicable diseases are the leading causes of death in individuals aged 63 years. These findings highlight the importance of preventive measures that can help to reduce the risk of chronic diseases such as heart disease, cancer, and diabetes. The data also underscores the continued importance of measures to control the spread of COVID-19, including vaccination and other public health measures aimed at preventing the spread of the virus.

Top Causes of Death for Age 63 Men

Cause of DeathTotal Deaths
Heart Disease9,583
Cancer7,784
COVID-195,390
Accidents (Incl. Overdoses)2,202
Diabetes1,441
Chronic Lower Respiratory Disease1,381
Liver Disease (incl. Cirrhosis)1,224
Suicide513
Kidney Disease468
Septicemia429
Flu (Non-COVID)371
Pneumonitis Due To Solids & Liquids164
Homicide113
HIV111
Viral Hepatitis101
Parkinson’s Disease94
Alzheimer’s Disease87
Congenital Malformations70
Nutritional Deficiency60
Peptic Ulcer54
Anemias40
Gallbladder Disorder33
Enterocolitis33

Looking at the mortality data for men aged 63, we can see that heart disease is the primary cause of death, with 9,583 reported deaths. Cancer is the second leading cause of death, responsible for 7,784 deaths, followed by COVID-19, which caused 5,390 deaths among this age group.

Accidents, including overdoses, were the fourth leading cause of death in 63-year-old men, resulting in 2,202 deaths. Diabetes and chronic lower respiratory disease were also significant causes of mortality among men in this age group, responsible for 1,441 and 1,381 deaths, respectively.

Liver disease, including cirrhosis, was the cause of death in 1,224 men, while suicide was responsible for 513 deaths. Kidney disease and septicemia resulted in 468 and 429 deaths, respectively. Non-COVID flu caused 371 deaths among men aged 63.

Other notable causes of mortality among 63-year-old men included pneumonia due to solids and liquids, homicide, HIV, and viral hepatitis. Parkinson’s disease, Alzheimer’s disease, congenital malformations, nutritional deficiency, peptic ulcer, anemia, and gallbladder disorders were also reported causes of death.

In summary, the mortality data for 63-year-old men indicates that heart disease, cancer, and COVID-19 remain the leading causes of death, followed by accidents, diabetes, and chronic lower respiratory disease. It is imperative to understand these leading causes of mortality to develop effective preventive measures and healthcare strategies aimed at reducing mortality and improving health outcomes for this demographic.

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Common Causes of Death for 63-Year-Old Women

Cause of DeathTotal Deaths
Cancer6,464
Heart Disease4,792
COVID-193,648
Chronic Lower Respiratory Disease1,230
Accidents (Incl. Overdoses)836
Diabetes812
Liver Disease (incl. Cirrhosis)629
Septicemia383
Kidney Disease357
Flu (Non-COVID)250
Alzheimer’s Disease155
Suicide136
Pneumonitis Due To Solids & Liquids97
Congenital Malformations69
Viral Hepatitis54
Parkinson’s Disease50
Nutritional Deficiency49
Anemias41
Peptic Ulcer32
Homicide31
HIV29
Enterocolitis25

When analyzing the CDC data for 63-year-old women, cancer is the primary cause of death, with 6,464 reported deaths. Heart disease is the second leading cause of death, with 4,792 reported deaths. COVID-19 is the third leading cause of death with 3,648 reported deaths, followed by chronic lower respiratory disease, which caused 1,230 deaths among women aged 63 years.

Other common causes of mortality in this age group include accidents (including overdoses), diabetes, liver disease (including cirrhosis), and septicemia. Flu (non-COVID), Alzheimer’s disease, suicide, and pneumonitis due to solids and liquids also contributed significantly to the mortality of women aged 63 years.

Among the less common causes of death were Parkinson’s disease, viral hepatitis, and homicide. Nutritional deficiency, anemias, peptic ulcer, HIV, and enterocolitis were also reported as contributing causes of death among some women in this age group.

The data suggests that cancer is the primary cause of death in 63-year-old women, followed by heart disease and COVID-19. The data highlights the importance of preventive measures that can help to reduce the risk of chronic diseases such as cancer and heart disease, as well as effective measures to control the spread of COVID-19.