Leading Causes of Death for 84-Year-Olds

Aging is universal, but the way people age varies from person to person. At the age of 84, most seniors may experience chronic illnesses and age-related diseases that affect their overall health and lifespan. This article delves into the leading causes of death for 84-year-olds, from cancer to heart disease and the steps you can take to care for your health throughout your golden years. Whether you are an 84-year-old seeking knowledge or someone with an elderly loved one, this article provides valuable insights on the common health concerns that may arise at this age range. (Note: See here for 83-year-old causes of death or here for the most common causes of death for 85-year-olds.)

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Leading Causes of Death for 84-Year-Olds (2021 CDC Data)

Cause of DeathTotal Deaths
Heart Disease25,627
Cancer13,901
COVID-198,933
Alzheimer’s Disease5,003
Chronic Lower Respiratory Disease4,169
Diabetes2,235
Accidents (Incl. Overdoses)2,230
Parkinson’s Disease1,857
Kidney Disease1,561
Flu (Non-COVID)1,220
Septicemia1,018
Nutritional Deficiency588
Pneumonitis Due To Solids & Liquids568
Liver Disease (incl. Cirrhosis)365
Suicide214
Anemias150
Enterocolitis149
Gallbladder Disorder126
Peptic Ulcer89
Hernia74
Prostate Hyperplasia26
Congenital Malformations25

According to the 2021 CDC data, heart disease tops the list of leading causes of death for 84-year-olds, with 25,627 fatalities. This is followed by cancer, which claimed 13,901 lives. Interestingly, COVID-19 is the third leading cause, with 8,933 deaths. This is not surprising, given that the pandemic has affected people of all ages and demographics.

Other notable causes of death on the list include Alzheimer’s disease, which caused 5,003 fatalities, chronic lower respiratory disease, which led to 4,169 deaths, and diabetes, which claimed 2,235 lives. Accidents (including overdoses) caused 2,230 fatalities, while Parkinson’s disease led to 1,857 deaths. Kidney disease and the flu (non-COVID) also made the list, with 1,561 and 1,220 fatalities, respectively.

It is also worth noting that nutritional deficiency, pneumonitis due to solids and liquids, and liver disease (including cirrhosis) caused fewer deaths compared to other causes. Suicide, anemia, enterocolitis, and gallbladder disorder were also relatively low on the list, causing 214, 150, 149, and 126 deaths, respectively.

Overall, these statistics provide valuable insights into the causes of mortality for 84-year-olds, and can help policymakers and health professionals develop strategies and interventions aimed at reducing these numbers.

Top Causes of Death for Age 84 Men

Cause of DeathTotal Deaths
Heart Disease12,567
Cancer7,243
COVID-194,833
Chronic Lower Respiratory Disease1,899
Alzheimer’s Disease1,756
Accidents (Incl. Overdoses)1,152
Diabetes1,141
Parkinson’s Disease1,118
Kidney Disease804
Flu (Non-COVID)634
Septicemia485
Pneumonitis Due To Solids & Liquids334
Nutritional Deficiency225
Suicide214
Liver Disease (incl. Cirrhosis)193
Anemias72
Gallbladder Disorder66
Enterocolitis55
Peptic Ulcer40
Hernia30
Prostate Hyperplasia26

When looking at the causes of death for 84-year-old men, we can see some similarities with the overall data: heart disease remains the leading cause of death with a total of 12,567 fatalities, followed by cancer with 7,243 deaths. COVID-19 is the third leading cause with a total of 4,833 fatalities, while chronic lower respiratory disease caused 1,899 deaths. Alzheimer’s disease is also among the leading causes of death among men, causing 1,756 fatalities.

Additionally, accidents (including overdoses) were a significant cause of death among 84-year-old men, causing 1,152 fatalities. Meanwhile, Parkinson’s disease, kidney disease, and the flu (non-COVID) caused 1,118, 804, and 634 deaths, respectively. Septicemia caused 485 deaths, while pneumonitis due to solids and liquids caused 334 deaths.

Other notable causes of death among 84-year-old men in the dataset include diabetes, suicide, liver disease (including cirrhosis), and anemias. Nutritional deficiency, gallbladder disorder, enterocolitis, peptic ulcer, hernia, and prostate hyperplasia also caused relatively fewer deaths.

Overall, the data shows that heart disease, cancer, and COVID-19 remain the leading causes of death among 84-year-old men. However, accidents and Parkinson’s disease appear to be more significant causes of death for men compared to the total dataset.

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Common Causes of Death for 84-Year-Old Women

Cause of DeathTotal Deaths
Heart Disease13,060
Cancer6,658
COVID-194,100
Alzheimer’s Disease3,247
Chronic Lower Respiratory Disease2,270
Diabetes1,094
Accidents (Incl. Overdoses)1,078
Kidney Disease757
Parkinson’s Disease739
Flu (Non-COVID)586
Septicemia533
Nutritional Deficiency363
Pneumonitis Due To Solids & Liquids234
Liver Disease (incl. Cirrhosis)172
Enterocolitis94
Anemias78
Gallbladder Disorder60
Peptic Ulcer49
Hernia44
Congenital Malformations25

Looking at the mortality data for 84-year-old women, heart disease once again tops the list of common causes of death, with 13,060 fatalities. Cancer is the second leading cause of death, with 6,658 women succumbing to the disease, followed by COVID-19, which caused 4,100 fatalities. Alzheimer’s disease is the fourth leading cause of death, with 3,247 women passing away due to the illness, while chronic lower respiratory disease caused 2,270 deaths.

Other leading causes of death on the list include diabetes, which claimed 1,094 lives, as well as accidents (including overdoses) and kidney disease, each of which led to over 700 deaths. Parkinson’s disease, the flu (non-COVID), and septicemia also made the list, with each causing over 500 deaths.

There were also relatively fewer deaths related to other causes, such as nutritional deficiency, pneumonitis due to solids and liquids, and liver disease (including cirrhosis). Enterocolitis, anemia, gallbladder disorder, and peptic ulcer were even less common, each causing fewer than 100 deaths.

Overall, this data highlights the leading causes of death among 84-year-old women, providing valuable insights into the prevalence of different health conditions in this age group.